Let the soul of NIR go

“There’s a victory in letting go of your expectations.” – Mike White

NEW YORK CITY – At the Diagnostic Clinic of the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens on August 9, I declined the request of Dr. June Chatterjee for me to undergo HIV testing.

At first, I did not object thinking it was part of the clinic’s random examination.

The medical staff showed to me Dr. Chatterjee’s referral letter with a note, “Patient advised HIV testing to be done and did not object: Yes”.

She did not complain when I invoked my right not to undergo such examination.

My appointment in the hospital was for laboratory examination arranged by Dr. Selina Zaman two weeks ago.

Two of the four other patients Dr. Chatterjee had examined before me probably came in the clinic for HIV testing. She must’ve thought I also came for that purpose.

 

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The Negros Island Region (NIR) in the Philippine is now a thing of the past.

There’s nothing dyed-in-the-wool proponents can do now to bring it back to life.

There’s no use crying over spilled milk. Life must go on for the living. Let go of the NIR’s soul.

It was President Noynoy’s E.O. that created it, and Pres. Digong’s E.O. that killed it. A tit for a tat.

Since Congress was not involved in NIR’s inception in the previous administration, there was no knee-jerk furor when the present administration banished it.

Palace had been firm in its decision to reject NIR: it’s “too costly” and “unnecessary” especially when the proposed federalism would be in full swing.

The projected P19-billion that would have been wasted to sustain NIR could now be used to finance some of the administration’s projects in social, health, infrastructure, and education sectors.

Whether Negros is divided into two provinces doesn’t bother some ordinary Negrenses, at all.

“New technology,” according to Budget Secretary Benjamin Diokno, will enable the speedy provision of government services to these provinces.

The people’s primary concern is to eke out a decent living, bring home food on the table and make sure their families won’t starve.

 

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Mayor Geffrey Alonsabe of Alimodian, Iloilo told Agriculture Secretary Manny Piñol during a recent press conference in Iloilo City that he did not know that the persons using the name of the Department of Agriculture (DA) and who approached him and “sold” farm-to-market roads (FMR) were scammers.

According to Alonsabe, “without his knowledge”, the scammers arranged the contractors. He reportedly learned lately that the scammers demanded 10 percent of P100-million project.

“Nag-initial sila ng one million, then, lately gusto nila pa-dungangan sang five percent kay i-release na kuno ang pondo,” The Daily Guardian reporter Maricyn A. De Los Santos quoted Alonsabe as saying.

Piñol surmised Alonsabe and other mayors who may have fallen prey to the anomaly had been duped.

But how come Alonsabe failed to identify anyone of the alleged FMR scammers?

Can a municipal mayor start to discuss projects worth millions of pesos to a person or group of persons he doesn’t know from Adam?

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